Complete Hotels List

Hotel Terms

Namesort descending Term description
Albermarle Arms

There were numerous hotels known by this name in Tasmania, one in New Norfolk in the 1820s, one in York Plains in the 1830s, and one in the upper part of Goulburn Street, Hobart, in the 1840s. In the 1860s, it was reported that -

A Publican Suffocated by Gas. - An inquest was held on Friday afternoon, before A. B. Jones, Esq. City Coroner, at the Albemarle Arms, on view of the body of William Berry, late licensee of that house, who was found dead in his bed on the previous morning.

Source: "TASMANIA." The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) 10 Nov 1864: page 3. Web. 9 Mar 2013; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18697913.

Angel Inn

Description of the Angel Inn Hotel in Tasmania to be entered here.

Birmingham Arms

The Birmingham Arms Inn was in Hobart, Tasmania, "located in what was originally a 'seedy' part of the city, the inn flourished when the area was part of the brothel belt that linked other pubs in the vicinity. Its site was described as being three doors north of the White Conduit House Inn in Murray Street, making it roughly where the Harvey Norman complex is today." Source: Dennison, C.J. Here's Cheers: Hobart, HCC, 2008; p. 39

Bluebell Inn

Description of the Bluebell Inn at Sorell in Tasmania to be entered here.

Bridge Inn

The Bridge Inn was at Deep Creek in Victoria. In 1844 the former Chief Constable of Melbourne, William 'Tulip' Wright, built the first hotel, the Bridge Inn, by the Deep Creek. Until the late 1840s Bulla consisted of little more than Tulip's hotel and residence, but as the surrounding land was taken up for farming the township expanded as a service centre. Source: eMelbourne: Bulla, citing Symonds, I.W., Bulla Bulla: An illustrated history of the Shire of Bulla, Spectrum, Melbourne, 1985.

Bristol Arms

Also known as "The City of Bristol Arms", this hotel was in Campbell Street, Hobart, Tasmania. Licensees included:

  • Dec 1861: William Cowley (The Mercury Tuesday 3 December 1861)
  • Dec 1863: William Cowley (The Mercury Wednesday 2 December 1863)
  • Dec 1866: George Bezotto (The Mercury Monday 3 December 1866[)
Brunswick

The Brunswick was originally built in 1827 by convicts just twenty years after the settlement of Hobart, and remains an important part of Tasmania’s social history. The Brunswick Hotel initially operated as an illegal grog shop under the title of “Brunswick Wine Vaults”. In 1831 it was granted its first liquor licence and began trading under the name “The Brunswick Hotel”. The hotel is now the oldest operating example of the once numerous drinking establishments that lined Liverpool Street in the 1800’s. Following a devastating fire in 1926 the façade and parts of the building was rebuilt, but much of the original food and beverage area remains.... Source: The Brunswick Hotel

Bull And Mouth

The were a number of hotels using this unusual name: The Bull and Mouth in Tasmania "...is still standing a few doors south of Melville Street, on the western side. It opened in 1857." Source: Dennison, C.J. Here's Cheers: Hobart, HCC, 2008; p. 14 The Bull and Mouth in Victoria was in Bourke Street, Melbourne, and operated by William J. Sugden in the 1850's. Source: Garryowen: Chronicles of Early Melbourne, Ferguson & Mitchell, 1888

Butchers Arms

Description of the Butchers Arms hotel to be entered here.

Caledonian

Description of the hotel Caledonian in Tasmania to be entered here.

Canterbury Inn

The Canterbury Inn in Tasmania was ...located about halfway between Brisbane and Patrick streets, on the Western side of Elizabeth street. It was listed in 1826 as the Somerset Arms, then renamed by 1835 as The Canterbury Inn. One of the better known owners was Joseph Moir, recognised for his role in developing the Shot Tower at Taroona. Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008.

The Inn was the subject of controversy over the years, particularly at times of license transfers and ownership changes. In 1874 a Mr. Daly sought to transfer the license to a Mr. Sparagrove but this was refused on the grounds that the proposed licensee was not suitable, (The Tasmanian Tribune 14 Oct 1874) and in 1908 a Mrs. Clara Thureau who owned the Inn ended up in a legal dispute over the settlement. ( The Mercury 13 Jun 1908)

City Arms

Description of the City Arms hotel in Tasmania to be entered here...

Coach and Horses

A number of hotels were called the Coach and Horses in Tasmania. Nicholas Augustus Woods had an establishment by that name in Oatlands in the mid 1800s. Source: "COUNTRY LICENSING MEETINGS." The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) 5 Dec 1864: 2. Web. 4 Jan 2014; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8829851. A Mr. H. Evans was also the proprietor of a hotel with that name on the corner of Charles and Patterson streets in Launceston in the early 1900s. Source: "HOTEL IMPROVEMENTS." Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 - 1954) 13 Oct 1905: 6 Edition: DAILY.. Web. 8 Jan 2014; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38802821.

Dallas Arms

The Dallas Arms hotel was in Hobart, Tasmania. According to Colin Dennison, the Dallas Arms "...located on the eastern side of Elizabeth street, a couple of doors north of Burnett street ... opened in 1827 and was owned by the Davis family." Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008. William Bunster purchased the building at public auction in July 1834. The Allan family purchased the license for the Inn in 1844 and operated it until the early 1900s.

Dorchester Butt

The Dorchester Butt in Hobart, Tasmania, began life as the Dolphin in 1820 but was renamed the Dorchester Butt in 1834. It was later changed yet again to the Sir John Falstaff until in 1868 it became a private residence. In 1890 it assumed the name we know it as today, the Theatre Royal Hotel, although the building was demolished and rebuilt in 1904. Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008. p. 154

Duke of York

The were at least two hotels using the name Duke of York, one located in Hobart on the corner of Argyle and Bathurst streets, the other in Battery Point in Hampden Road, both in Tasmania. According to Colin Dennison, discussing the Hobart hotel, Shadowy dealings of some kind are linked to this hotel, which opened as the Kensington Inn in 1837... The name was changed to Duke of York Hotel in the early 1900s, but its license was suspended in 1916, as a result of a royal commission. The hotel had traded for almost seven decades. Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008; p. 135. The Duke of York in Hampden Road, Battery Point was known to be trading in the mid 1850s. Source: The Hobarton Mercury Wednesday 10 December 1856

Eagle Tavern

"Up and down the city road. In and out the Eagle." The Eagle Tavern in Hindley street is probably as well known in Adelaide as that old couplet, and as many people must have patronised the hostelry as have whistled the tune that parrots are always taught. There are men who walk into the Eagle to-day who remember it 30 years ago. It was a great place of call, and a most popular hotel for people to stay at in the early days. The last man who will have charge of the Eagle is Mr. C. Cocks, who not long ago kept the Halfway House, on the Bay road. The ancient tavern is to he pulled down, and the South-Australian Company, who have a building lease, intend to erect a commodious hotel on the old site. The man who is best remembered at the Eagle is Mr. McKenzie, who was land lord for many years. His daughter married Mr. Rooney, who also had the house. The old timers are wont to talk about how they dropped. into the Eagle in the fifties. If the place could speak it could tell some wonderful tales. Source: "THE EAGLE TAVERN." The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) 14 Jan 1903: 4. Web. 26 Apr 2013 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59939706.

Edinburgh Castle

The Edinburgh Castle "...on the south-western corner of Harrington and Bathurst streets...began life as the Tavistock, but by 1824 the name had changed to Waterloo and then later to the Edinburgh Castle....It lasted until 1860 when it closed its doors for the last time." Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008; p. 237

Emu Inn

Description of the Emu Inn hotel to be entered here...

English French and American Hotel

Description of the English French and American Hotel to be entered here...

Freemasons Arms

Description of the hotel Freemasons Arms to be entered here...

Golden Cross

Description of the Golden Cross hotel to be entered here.

Horse Shoe Inn

Description of the Horse Shoe Inn to be entered here...

Irish Arms

Description of the Irish Arms hotel in Parramatta to be entered here...

Jolly Hatter

With a name like this, it comes as no surprise that the building was originally constructed in 1824 as a hat factory. Located 30 metres from Elizabeth Street, on the northern side, it was converted to a hotel in 1833... Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008; p. 215

Junction Hotel

Description of the hotel Junction hotel to be entered here...

Kensington Inn

There have been two hotels in Tasmania with this name, one in Hobart and one in Glenorchy. The Hobart based hotel opened in 1837 on the corner of Argyle and Bathurst street. The name was changed to the Duke of York in the early 1900s. It has also been called The Men's Gallery in more recent times but it is now the site of a high rise car park. Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008, p. 135. The Glenorchy based hotel opened in the early 1830s at 387-391 Main Road, Glenorchy. It was licensed by Joseph Walton in 1833 (but was formerly Mr. Johnsons) and known as both the Kensington Inn and the Kensington Arms. The hotel has subsequently been renamed The Racecourse Hotel. Source: Donald Howatson: The Pubs of Glenorchy; Privately Published, 2011.

Kentishbury Hotel

Description of the Kentishbury Hotel to be entered here.

Lamb Inn

The Lamb Inn has been used as the name of a couple of hotels.

John Willis was registered as a licensed victualler in Sorell with the Lamb Inn on 13 December 1833. Source: HTG 13 Dec 1833

There was also a Lamb Inn in Brisbane Street, a couple of doors east of Murray Street, which opened in 1825 and closed as a hotel in 1862. Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008; p. 243

Lion Inn

The Lion Inn hotel was in Jerusalem, or what is now called Colebrook, Tasmania. William Lewis was the licensee from 1867 to at least 1875. The funeral of William's mother in law Sarah Bunker, nee Goodwin, left from the Lion Inn in December 1871. Source: The Mercury 28 Dec 1871 The Hotel had been in existence since at least 1856 when it is mentioned in relation to the forthcoming election of members of the new parliament of Tasmania. Source: The Hobarton Mercury 14 May 1856 At that time it was owned by John McConnon. Source: The Hobarton Mercury 19 May 1856

Macquarie Hotel

Description of the hotel Macquarie Hotel to be entered here...

Miner's Rest

Description of the Miner's Rest hotel to be entered here...

New Market Inn

Description of the New Market Inn to be entered here.

Ordnance Arms

Description of the hotel Ordnance Arms to be entered here...

Poimena Hotel

Description of the Poimena hotel to be entered here...

Prince of Wales

The Prince of Wales hotel is in the Battery Point area of Hobart in Tasmania. The original hotel was built in 1843 on the corner of Hampden Road and Kelly Street. It started trading as a hotel the following year and remained successful until 1960 when it was demolished as part of efforts to widen streets in the area. The Prince of Wales was resurrected when a replacement was built on the same site. Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008; p. 75

Red Lion

Description of the hotel Red Lion to be entered here...

Richmond

Description of the Richmond hotel to be entered here.

Rose and Crown

The Rose and Crown was on New Town Road and was operated by Robert Frost between 1830 and 1838. Source: Colonial Times 1 October 1830 Either that hotel continued, or there was one with the same name, as there is a record of the Rose and Crown operating in Elizabeth Street in 1915 with the operator being Andrew J. Bashfield. Source: AIF Project page for Henry Dundas Bashfield.

Royal Mail

The Royal Mail hotel was in Melbourne, Victoria. On 8 August 1848 W. J. Sugden became the licensee of the Royal Mail Hotel at the south east corner of Swanston St and Bourke St. Sugden continued to be mentioned in relation to this hotel up to 3 September 1851 and obtained one of the few city night licenses enabling him to remain open after 9 p.m. Source: O'Neill, Sue: Publicans Index of 19th Century Victoria, Rootsweb

Royal Mint

Description of the hotel Royal Mint to be entered here...

Royal Standard

...this hotel was built on the south-western corner of Patrick and Elizabeth streets. It was first opened about 1826 as the White Hart but almost two decades later, in 1845, became the Royal Standard Hotel...

Although it still appeared on drainage plans in 1904 it is thought it had been demolished by then. Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008.; p. 22

Sailor's Delight

Description of the hotel Sailor's Delight to be entered here.

Ship Inn
Description of the Ship Inn hotel to be entered here...
Sir John Franklin

The Sir John Franklin hotel was in Sunbury, Victoria. ...in 1854 (Tulip) Wright built the Sir John Franklin hotel on Vaughan Street, at its junction with Macedon Street, possibly to tap the custom of both routes. Source: Hume City Council: Heritage Citation - Jackson's Ford, Sunbury. The hotel was named ...after the ill-fated explorer who, when Governor of Tasmania, thought very highly of Wright... Source: Maurice Walsh: Tales of Taverns in the Victoria Colony

Star and Garter

The Star and Garter hotel was located in Richmond, Tasmania. Thomas Burgess is mentioned in the Hobart Town Gazette in October 1845 as the licensee of the hotel. He was partnered in the lease with Ephraim Lake between 1846 and 1848 but took it back over as the sole operator between 1849 and 1851. Source: HTG 7 Oct 1845, 6 Oct 1846, 25 Sep 1847, 16 Sep 1848, 27 Sep 1849, 29 Sep 1850, 7 Oct 1851. In early 1865 Henry Briggs was granted a publicans license to operate the hotel. That arrangement continued until at least 1868. Source: HTG 7 February 1865, Mercury 1 May 1868.

Stowell Arms

Description of the Stowell Arms hotel to be entered here.

Tasmanian Arms

Description of the Tasmanian Arms hotel to be entered here...

Tasmanian Inn

There were three Hobart hotels to carry the name. The first was situated on the south east corner of Campbell and Liverpool Streets and was first listed in the Hobart Town Gazette in 1833. It was advertised in the Colonial Times for let in 1847. Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008; p. 155

The second was situated on the corner of Campbell and Warwick Streets it started trading in 1851. For a brief period about 1915 it was renamed the Tasmanian Hotel but it soon reverted to the orginal name. Source: Dennison, C. J.: Here's Cheers: A Pictorial History of Hotels, Taverns and Inns in Hobart; HCC, 2008; p. 157

The British Hotel

The British Hotel was in the parish of Woranga in Victoria. The hotel was leased by Edwin Hobson in the late 1850s and early 1860s. In the late 1860s the hotel was leased by a Mr. Watson. The Port Albert to Sale coaches, which passed the "British Hotel" had to struggle with one of the worst roads in the colony and journeys could take up to three times as long as they should, with frequent changes of horses. Needless to say when the creek was flooding the passengers were unloaded from the coach and had to walk through the crossing , the pub must have been very welcoming! Source: Yarram Genealogy Group: Lillies Leaf; http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ausygs/p45.htm

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