James Wilson and Catherine Boak

James Wilson and Catherine Boak are the ancestors of the Wilson family that would later emigrate in large numbers to Tasmania. As discussed in the Introduction James Wilson has been linked to the Wilson family of Wilsontown Ironworks fame but there are no historical records to substantiate that arrangement. The proposed origins for James Wilson are documented in The Wilson Family of Uphall section, in particular see his Wilson Family of Uphall Register entry.

The first recorded event for James Wilson is the birth of his daughter Mary in 1782. Mary's mother was recorded as Catherine Boak. Catherine's origins have not been confirmed. In the first instance both the given name and the surname have a number of variations that mean tracing Catherine's birth family difficult. Catherine is often reproduced as Katherine, and prominent variations of the surname include Boag and Boog, but there are numerous others: Begg, Beg, Baog, and Buik. The surname in Scotland is generally pronounced Boke and it is assumed the variations occur because of a lack of literacy and the variety of regional dialects. A search conducted on Scotland's People for Boak births and baptisms between the years 1730 and 1770 has not revealed any potential matches.

This lack of detail has not deterred someone giving Catherine a date of birth, in fact two, both the 29 September 1756 and 13 March 1760 have been recorded but neither has been substantiated by any historical documentation.1 Catherine has also been linked as the daughter of William Boak and Margaret Braidwood but again no birth record or any other historical documentation exists to confirm that family arrangement.2 That latter idea however is supported by a number of other factors.

William Boak and Margaret Braidwood married in November 1753 in Walston, Lanarkshire, Scotland.3 One child has been definitely traced to this family, that is the birth of their daughter Agnes on 30 April 1756 and baptised on 1 May 1756 in Walston, Lanarkshire, Scotland.4 The first factor which may confirm Catherine Boak as a daughter of William and Margaret is the Scottish naming pattern.

James Wilson and Catherine Boak named their children as follows: Mary, James, William, David, David, Thomas, Robert, Margaret, John and George. According to the Scottish naming pattern the first son is named for the father's father, and the second son for the mother's father. James and Catherine's second son was William which according to the tradition would have been the name of Catherine's father. The same tradition however should have meant that James and Catherine's first daughter would have been named Margaret and she wasn't, she was named Mary.

The second factor in favour of William and Margaret Boak as Catherine's parents is the use of the middle name Braidwood for their son Thomas. Given this name usage, and the marriage of a Boak and a Braidwood in a time frame where William and Margaret's marriage suits the expected birth date of Catherine, this is indeed strong evidence of a relationship. All those factors however only suggest a relationship, until a historical record is revealed that confirms matching Catherine with William and Margaret Boak such as a Will it will have to remain unfounded.

To return in detail to the children of James Wilson and Catherine Boak, and the proven information about this family, their first child was a daughter, Mary Wilson, baptised on 30 September 1782 in the district of Kirknewton and East Calder, Midlothian, Scotland:

This Day James Wilson in Corstown and Catharine Boag his Spowse had a child Baptised named Mary. Witnesses John Wardrop and William Hunter Elders.5

There is a record of Mary being born on 19 September 1782 but this is not noted in the baptism registration.6 The location of Corstown may refer to Crosstown but the baptism registration has been transcribed here exactly as it appears to read. The witness William Hunter has been noted as the husband of Helen Boak, and indeed a William Hunter did marry a Helen Boak on 25 November 1774 in Kirknewton and East Calder, Midlothian, Scotland.7 The relationship between Helen and Catharine is unknown, and as the baptism for Mary notes, William Hunter was an elder of the church and they were commonly expected to witness these occasions.

James and Catherine's second child, James Wilson, was baptised on 11 July 1784, again in the district of Kirknewton and East Calder:

This day James Wilson and Katherine Boak his Spouse had a Child baptised names James. Witnesses George Lowrie and John Hunter.8

The variability of these records is already apparent. On this occasion no location is cited for the couple, and Catherine's first name and surname are recorded differently from the baptism for their daughter Mary. This may imply that neither James or Catherine were literate, or that they simply left the actual process of registration up to a scribe. Again, there is a record for James being born on 4 July 1784 but this is not noted on the baptism registration so it is unknown where this information was obtained.9

James and Catherine's third child, and their second son, William Wilson was baptised on 9 April 1786 in the district of Kirknewton and East Calder:

This day James Wilson & Catherine Boak his spouse had a son baptised named William.10

No location is noted for James and Catherine, and no witnesses to the occasion were identified either. The registration place of Kirknewton and East Calder is in fact two locations, the two villages being just a short distance from each other. Kirknewton was described in 1895 as:

A village and a parish of W[est] Edinburghshire. The village stands 5 furlongs E[ast] by S[outh] of Midcalder or Kirknewton Junction on the Caledonian railway, this being 36 ¼ miles E[ast] of Glasgow, and 11 W[est]S[outh]W[est] of Edinburgh. It has a post office, with money order, savings bank, and telegraph departments, a public hall, an inn, and a police station.

The parish, containing also the villages of East Calder, Oakbank and Wilkieston, comprises the ancient parishes of Kirknewton and East Calder.

(Extract from Groomes Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland c.1895)11

William has been recorded as being born on 31 March 1786 and christened in Crosstown on 9 April 1786 but this is not reflected in the available baptism record.12 Nothing further is known about William at this time.

James and Catherine's next child, their fourth and third boy, was named David, and this time the baptism record is a little more illuminating:

Kirknewtown 29th June 1788 - James Wilson and Catherine Boag his spouse in Corston had a son Baptised named David - Witnesses John Wardrop and James Hunter - Elders.13

On this occasion the baptism was explicitly performed at Kirknewton, and again James and Catherine are noted as living in Corston. This has often been reproduced as Crosstown (and so the entry was considered a typographic error) but in fact there was a Corston Farm near East Calder which at the time was a significant property. It is possible that James Wilson was employed there as a farm labourer. David is also recorded as being born on 4 June 1788 but this is not in the baptism registration.14

It is presumed that James and Catherine's son David died in infancy relatively soon after his birth, as the next child born to the couple was also named David. David, their fifth child and fourth son, was baptised on 20 June 1790 in the Kirknewton and East Calder district as follows:

This day James Wilson in Corstown and Catherine (Boog) his spouse had a son baptised named David. Witnesses Robert Millar & James Hunter.15

Catherine's surname is in brackets because it seems to have been added as an afterthought, appearing above the line of text with a carat underneath. Again the reference to Corstown (Corston) is persistant. By the end of 1790 then the Wilson family comprised James, Catherine (both aged at least 24 but probably closer to 30 something), Mary (8), James (6), William (4) and David (an infant).

James and Catherine's sixth child is perhaps their most well known progeny. Thomas Wilson was baptised on 29 April 1792 in Kirknewton as follows:

This day James Wilson Plowman in Crosstown and Catherine Boak his Spouse had a son baptised named Thomas.16

For some reason there are two baptism entries for Thomas, with the second slighly different:

This day James Wilson in Crosstown & Catherine Boag his Spouse had a son baptised named Thomas.17

So in one record James Wilson's occupation is stated, and there is a differance in the spelling of Catherine's surname between the two registrations. According to other unsubstantiated documentation Thomas was born in Uphall, West Lothian, Scotland and christened at Crosstown but this is not reflected in the historical records.18 Thomas would later be known as Thomas Braidwood Wilson.

James and Catherine's seventh child, and sixth boy, was Robert Wilson, whose birth and baptism were also registered twice, both in Kirknewton:

Robert Wilson, son of James Wilson, Crosstown and Catherine Boak his Spouse was born on the 1st day of Jan 1795 and Baptised on the 26th day of Feby following.19

Robert Wilson, son of James Wilson in Crosstown & Catherine Boog his Spouse was born on 1st day of Jany 1795 & baptised on the 26th day of Feb; 1795.20

The couple's ninth child was their second daughter but for some reason no birth or baptism record has been located. There is documentation that Margaret Wilson was born on 1 October 1798 in Abercorn, West Lothian, Scotland but this is unsubstantiated, and Abercorn is not a region that has been associated with James Wilson and Catherine Boak.21 Even so Margaret is an acknowledged child of James and Catherine according to later events in the families history.

James and catherine's ninth child, another boy, was registered, and demonstrated a change in location for the family. John Wilson was born on 6 July 1801:

John, lawful son to James Wilson and his wife Catharine Boag in Curriehill was born July the 6th and baptised the nineteenth instant before the congregation.22

Curriehill is now a suburb of Edinburgh and is located in the North-West of the Parish of Currie. The area is about 5 kilometers from Kirknewton but the address change probably also represents a change in circumstances for the Wilson family. Perhaps James was forced to move further afield to find further work as a ploughman, or a similar position as an agricultural labourer. At the beginning of 1802 the Wilson family would have been comprised of James and Catherine (at least 34 years of age but probably in the forties) and their children Mary (19), James (17), William (15), David (11), Thomas (9), Robert (6), Margaret (3) and John (an infant).

The year after John's birth, Mary, the eldest daughter, married John White on 24 February 1802 in Canongate, Edinburgh, Scotland.23. The marriage date has also been recorded as 27 July 1802 but no such record has been located.24

The same is true for the birth of James and Catherine's youngest child, George Wilson, reported to have occurred on 12 December 1803 in Uphall, West Lothian, Scotland.25 Once again, George Wilson is an acknowledged member of this family due to the overwhelming evidence of later documentation. George was James and Catherine's tenth proven child, but there have been claims of the couple having other children, none of which has been substantiated by birth records or later supporting evidence.

What does strike any researcher of this family is the remarkable fate of the children, and there is much that doesn't make sense when compared against the humble beginnings of this family. Helen Brown, a notable Wilson family researcher, believes the two boys who did receive degrees, Thomas and Robert, would have been noticed within the Scottish education system at the time as being gifted and probably receiving scholarships to attend university. Thomas attended Edinburgh University to obtain a Medical degree, Robert also attended Edinburgh University to obtain a degree in divinity, and George Wilson was successful enough to become a veritable entrepreneur in Tasmania.

While Thomas and Robert Wilson exceeded the expectations of a tenanted farming family, James and David Wilson appear to have remained farm and itinerant labourers. James Wilson is recorded as marrying Agnes Patterson on 21 June 1816 in Uphall in Scotland.26 This event has not been found despite reviewing the Old Parish Registers of Scotland for Banns and Marriages for the period 1800-1825, and searching for Wilson, Patterson or Paterson marriages. The origins of Agnes Paterson are also unknown.

The youngest daughter in the family, Margaret Wilson, married William Byers on 12 November 1819 in the parish of Currie, Edinburgh, Scotland. William is recorded as "of this parish" while Margaret is recorded as "of Ratho".27 William Byers was born on 18 October 1789 in Abercorn, Scotland, the son of Robert Byers and Isobel Reid.28

David Wilson married Jean Crawford on 6 April 1821 in Muiravonside, Stirling, Scotland, their union having been proclaimed the previous month on 23 March 1821.29 Jean Crawford was born on 13 November 1791 in Muiravonside, Stirling, Scotland, the daughter of Alexander Crawford and Agnes Brown.30

Thomas Braidwood Wilson married Jane Thompson on 31 October 1826 in St. Oswalds, Durham, England.31 Jane Thompson was born on 23 October 1802 and baptised on 18 December 1803 in Durham, England, the daughter of John Thompson and Jayne Seymour.32

Robert Wilson married Helen Brodie on 21 September 1829 in St. Cuthberts, Edinburgh, Scotland.33 Helen Brodie was born on 28 January 1800 in Edinburgh, Scotland, the daughter of Andrew Brodie and Jean Clark.34 Helen was baptised on 28 June 1800 in St. Cuthberts.35

The youngest of the brothers, George Wilson, influenced no doubt by his older brother Thomas, looked further afield for opportunities. In 1831 he made arrangements for a grant of land in Van Diemen’s Land and in 1832 he relocated there, accompanying Thomas to the colony on the ship John while Thomas was the surgeon superintendent.36 Later that same year George Wilson married Marian Brock on 11 October 1832 in St. David's Cathedral, Hobart, Van Diemen's Land.37 Marion Brock was born on 10 March 1799 in Kirkliston, Scotland, the daughter of Henry Brock and Margaret Marshall.38

Whereas the marriages of the children are reliably reported events, we return to less reliable events when back in Scotland, Catherine Boak, nee Wilson, is reported to have died in 1834 but it is not stated where, nor has this been validated in any of the primary Scottish record repositories.39 Similarly, James Wilson is reported to have died in 1836, aged 71 years, and to have been buried in Greenoch Cemetery, Scotland, but no such record can be found.40 Given their unsubstantiated nature these reports cannot be replied upon.

We do know, as already touched upon, that James and Catherine’s son Thomas Braidwood Wilson worked as a Surgeon Superintendent on nine convict voyages. In the late 1830 and early 1840s he left the sea and became a gentleman farmer. It wasn’t long before a number of factors triggered a collapse of his aspirations. He made some poor investment decisions and a financial slump in both England and the colonies sealed his fate. He was facing bankruptcy when he died on 11 November 1843 in Braidwood, New South Wales. It is suggested that he may have committed suicide. Thomas was buried in Braidwood, New South Wales.41

Jean Wilson, nee Crawford, the wife of David Wilson died on 17 December 1849 in Ecclesmachan, West Lothian, Scotland.42 No record of this event is available when searching the Scotlands People site but the information has been verified from the headstone of both David and Jean.

James Wilson (Jnr.) is reported to have died on 21 January 1851 in Crichton, Scotland at the age of 66 years. According to the same source he was buried in Uphall, Scotland.43 No death registration matching that report has been found but a James Wilson did die on 25 January 1851 in Uphall at the age of 66 and was buried three days later on 28 January 1851, with both events occurring in Uphall. The cause of death may have been apoplexy, or a stroke (the register is unclear).44

By the time of the 1851 census David Wilson was on his own following the death of his wife some years ealier. He was still in the village of Ecclesmachan but only his daughter Agnes was living at home, no doubt caring for her father. David was described as a Stone Cutter, aged 60, and widowed. He is noted as being born in Kirknewton. Agnes was described as aged 22, and was noted as being born in Kirkliston.45

Just two years after the census David Wilson is recorded as dying on 30 June 1853 at Bathgate at the age of 63 years.46 No record of this event can be found on Scotlands People.

In 1855 there were a number of waves of migrations of Wilson family members from Scotland to Australia, most sponsored by James and Catherine’s son George Wilson. James Wilson’s widow Agnes and her children emigrated on the Storm Cloud. The children of David and Jean Wilson mostly arrived in 1855, some aboard the Chatham. William Byers and his wife Margaret Wilson and their children also arrived aboard the Chatham.

Not all emigrated of course, Robert Wilson and his wife Helen Brodie were well established at Greenoch in Renfrewshire where Robert was a minister of religion. They had six children, most of whom tragically died young. Robert’s wife Helen died on 4 April 1857 at 2 Nelson Street in West Greenoch, Renfrew, Scotland.47

Robert Wilson, 63, died on 23 April 1858 in at 2 Nelson Street, West Greenock, Renfrew, Scotland. The cause of death was also recorded as Pulmonary Consumption from which the deceased had suffered for several years. His parents were reported as James Wilson, Forrester (dec) and Catherine Wilson, maiden name Boak (dec). Robert was buried in Greenock, Renfrew, Scotland on 26 April 1858.48 Robert was buried in Greenoch, Renfrew, Scotland.

In Tasmania, the Wilson family prospered and multiplied. Unfortunately, so did the rabbits, much to the chagrin of John Wilson, who wrote to the newspapers about it in late 1871.

THE RABBIT NUISANCE.

TO THE EDITOR OF TUB MERCURY.

SIR,-It is with great reluctance that I again beg to intrude on your valuable space, but I cannot refrain from publicly acknowledging the joy and gladness produced by the promptitude displayed by parliament in introducing a measure at this early stage of their proceedings, having for its object the abatement of the rabbit nuisance; and, Sir, it appears I was right in not believing that foolish report that there were some hon. members who were opposed to the introduction of such a measure, for the bill has, it appears, passed its first reading without a dissentient voice. That speaks volumes for the earnest desire on the part of hon. members to promote the best interests of the colony. Nor is it easy to conceive a measure fraught with greater interest to the colonists generally than the extirpation of this great nuisance. Nor can it be doubted, now that Parliament has shown its earnestness in this matter, that hon. members will give this measure all that consideration which its importance demands, so as to make it as effective as possible.

Springfield, near Oatlands,
November 25th, 1871.
JOHN WILSON.49

DAYS GONE BY.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE MERCURY.

SIR,-It must be highly gratifying to those persons who took part in the survey of a projected Main Line Railway, upwards of twenty years ago, to find that in this more advanced state of the colony, their efforts will have become useful. Time makes wondrous changes.

One of our oldest colonists, Mr. John Wilson, of Springfield, Oatlands, was present when we started on Sprent's first surveying expedition for the Main Line Railway, and he it was who struck the first tree on the line at Mount Seymour. No doubt the above will be interesting to many of your numorous readers, who would wish to care for such reminiscences of days of yore.

I am, Sir,
ONE OF THE PARTY.50

George Wilson died on 27 March 1874 in Oatlands, Tasmania.51 George was buried in Oatlands, Tasmania.

WILSON.- On the 27th March, at Mount Seymour, after a long illness, George Wilson, aged 70 years. The funeral will move from Mr. Bacon's gate at 12 o'clock on Tuesday next. Friends are invited to attend.52

William Byers died on 6 October 1875 in Oatlands, Tasmania. The cause of death was recorded as Old Age (his reported age was 85), and the informant was William's son in-law John Hay.53 William was buried in Oatlands, Tasmania.

Byers.-On the 6th October, William Byers, late of Abercorn, Mid-Lothian, Scotland, in perfect, peace, aged 85 years.54

Just over a month later William was followed by his wife Margaret Byers (nee Wilson) who died on 17 November 1875 in Oatlands, Tasmania. Once again the cause of death was recorded as Old Age (her reported age was 76) and the informant again was Margaret's son in-law John Hay.55 Margaret was buried in Oatlands, Tasmania.

DEATHS - BYERS.-On 17th November, Margaret, relict of the late William Byers, The funeral will take place on Saturday, at one o'clock, and will proceed to the Presbyterian Burial Ground, Oatlands.56

BYERS,-On 17th November, at Hayfield, Tunnack (the residence of her son-in-law), Margaret Byers, relict of the late William Byers, late of Ecclesmachan, Mid-Lothian, Scotland, in the 76th year of her age, in perfect peace. Melbourne and home papers please copy.57

John Wilson, who had remained single, died on 3 February 1877 in Oatlands, Tasmania. The cause of death was recorded as softening of the brain, and debility as a result of old age. James Wilson of Ashgrove, his nephew, registered the event.58 John was buried in Oatlands, Tasmania.

WILSON. - On 3rd February, at Mount Seymour, John Wilson, aged 75. The funeral will arrive at the burial ground, Oatlands, THIS DAY, 6th inst, at 3 o'clock p.m. friends are invited to attend.59

Marion Wilson (nee Brock), the widow of George Wilson, died on 22 February 1882 at O'Brien's Bridge at the reported age of 84 years. The cause of death was recorded as paralysis, so potentially a stroke.60

WllSON -On Wednesday, February 22, at Seymour Cottage, O'Brien's Bridge, Marion, relict of the late Geo. Wilson, of Mount Seymour, in the 83rd year of her age. The funeral will start from the Oatlands station, at a quarter past 3 o'clock p m. THIS DAY, the 25th inst., for the Free Church burial ground, when friends are invited to attend.61

Agnes Wilson (nee Patterson) died on 7 December 1888 at the "Crichton" property in Oatlands, Tasmania. Agnes was recorded as the wife of a farmer, aged 93 years, and the cause of death was noted as "old age". Sarah Ann Thomas, the wife of the undertaker, was the informant for the event which occurred on 10 December 1888.62 Agnes was buried at Oatlands, Tasmania.63

  • 1. Rackham, Margaret: Family Group Sheets; Privately Published; Book 2, Page 2 (Mrs. Rackham records these dates but is not believed to have been the researcher who ascribed them to Catherine Boak).
  • 2. Again, it is not known when this relationship was suggested but it has been reported by numerous researchers, in particular Norman Braidwood, and Gwenda Oxley.
  • 3. "Scotland Marriages, 1561-1910," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XT1N-5LH : accessed 22 March 2016), William Boak and Margaret Braidwood, Nov 1753; citing Walston,Lanark,Scotland, reference ; FHL microfilm 1,066,607, 102,969.
  • 4. GROS OPR Births 658/0010 0126 Walston
  • 5. GROS OPR Births 690/0030 0073 Kirknewton and East Calder
  • 6. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 3.
  • 7. GROS OPR Marriages 690/0030 0189 Kirknewton and East Calder
  • 8. GROS OPR Births 690/0030 0083 Kirknewton and East Calder
  • 9. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 3.
  • 10. GROS OPR Births 690/0030 0099 Kirknewton and East Calder
  • 11. Genuki: UK and Ireland Genealogy; http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/sct/MLN/Kirknewton/index.html (viewed 2 March 2011)
  • 12. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 3.
  • 13. GROS OPR Births 690/0030 0232 Kirknewton and East Calder
  • 14. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 3.
  • 15. GROS OPR Births 690/0030 0236 Kirknewton and East Calder
  • 16. GROS OPR Births 690/0030 0113 Kirknewton and East Calder
  • 17. GROS OPR Births 690/0030 0242 Kirknewton and East Calder
  • 18. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 3.
  • 19. GROS OPR Births 690/0030 0119 Kirknewton and East Calder
  • 20. GROS OPR Births 690/0030 0249 Kirknewton and East Calder
  • 21. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 3.
  • 22. GROS OPR Births 682/0020 0214 Currie
  • 23. GROS OPR Marriages 685/03 0160 0369 Canongate
  • 24. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 3
  • 25. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 3.
  • 26. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 5.
  • 27. GROS OPR Marriages 682/00 0030 0125 Currie
  • 28. GROS OPR Births 661/00 0030 0111 Abercorn.
  • 29. GROS OPR Marriages 486/00 0020 0107 Muiravonside and "Scotland Marriages, 1561-1910," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XY76-YXH : accessed 22 March 2016), David Wilson and Jean Crawford, 06 Apr 1821; citing Muiravonside,Stirling,Scotland, reference ; FHL microfilm 1,041,954, 102,123.
  • 30. "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XT2N-V3X : accessed 22 March 2016), Jean Crawfurd, 13 Nov 1791; citing , reference 2:17W35Q4; FHL microfilm 1,041,954.
  • 31. Durham Records Online: http://www.durhamrecordsonline.com/ (Marriage Bonds, Durham Diocese District - Record Number: 537598.14)
  • 32. "England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N58Y-HH8 : accessed 22 March 2016), Jane Thompson, 18 Dec 1803; citing , reference ; FHL microfilm 91,114, 91,115, 91,116.
  • 33. GROS OPR Marriages 685/02 0410 0487 St Cuthberts.
  • 34. GROS OPR Baptisms 685/02 0120 0453 St Cuthbert's
  • 35. "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VQCH-94F : accessed 12 December 2015), Helen Brodie, 28 Jun 1800; citing SAINT CUTHBERTS, EDINBURGH, MIDLOTHIAN, SCOTLAND, reference ; FHL microfilm 1,066,755, 103,058.
  • 36. TAHO LSD1/1/109 p. 819 and Chapman, Peter (Ed.): The diaries and letters of G. T. W. B. Boyes. Volume 1. 1820-1832; Oxford University Press; Melbourne, 1985. pp. 399-402
  • 37. TAHO Marriage Registration RGD 1832/1883
  • 38. Norman, Don: Some Notes on George Wilson Snr., His Ancestors and Descendants; Privately Published, 1989
  • 39. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 3.
  • 40. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 3.
  • 41. NSW BDM Death Registration V18431086 103 1843
  • 42. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 32.
  • 43. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 5.
  • 44. GROS OPR Deaths 672/00 0030 0257 Uphall or Strathbrock
  • 45. GROS Census 1851 666/00 001/00 005
  • 46. Rackham, Margaret, Family Group Sheets, "Wilson Descendants," Book 2, Page 32.
  • 47. GROS SR Statuatory Deaths 564/03 0190
  • 48. GROS SR Statuatory Deaths 564/03 0212
  • 49. "THE RABBIT NUISANCE." The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) 1 December 1871: 2. Web. 6 Mar 2016; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8873452.
  • 50. The Mercury Friday 12 July 1872
  • 51. TAHO Death Registration RGD 1874/517
  • 52. "Family Notices" The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) 28 March 1874: 1. Web. 6 Mar 2016; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8929020.
  • 53. TAHO Death Registration RGD 1875/707
  • 54. The Mercury Monday 1 November 1875
  • 55. TAHO Death Registration RGD 1875/711
  • 56. "Family Notices" The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) 19 November 1875: 1. Web. 6 Mar 2016; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8941204.
  • 57. "Family Notices" The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) 1 December 1875: 1. Web. 6 Mar 2016; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8941477.
  • 58. TAHO Death Registration RGD 1877/598
  • 59. "Family Notices" The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) 6 February 1877: 1. Web. 6 Mar 2016; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8951028.
  • 60. TAHO Death Registration RGD 1882/14
  • 61. "Family Notices" The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) 25 February 1882: 1. Web. 6 Mar 2016; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9006334.
  • 62. AOT Death Registration RGD 1888/619
  • 63. Grave 1061.

Locations: 

John Horton
John Horton's picture
Death of Catherine Wilson (nee Boak)

A search of the relevant records for any deaths of a Catherine Wilson (including forename variants) between 1830 and 1840 has not revealed Catherine's death date.

No Date Surname Forename Other Name / Frame No Sex Parish City / County
1 04/01/1831 WILSON CATHERINE ----- F CUPAR /FIFE
2 18/09/1831 WILSON CATHERINE STEWART / JOHN WILSON F ST CUTHBERT'S EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
3 14/11/1831 WILSON CATHERINE WILLIAM WILSON F EDINBURGH EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
4 01/09/1832 WILSON CATHERINE ----- F ST CUTHBERT'S EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
5 19/09/1832 WILSON CATHERINE JOHN WILSON F LEITH SOUTH EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
6 13/05/1833 WILSON CATHERINE ERSKINE / WM WILSON F ST CUTHBERT'S EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
7 16/05/1833 WILSON CATHERINE ----- F GLASGOW GLASGOW CITY CITY/LANARK
8 10/11/1834 WILSON CATHERINE ISABE JAMES WILSON F EDINBURGH EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
9 18/04/1835 WILSON CATHERINE JOHN WILSON F ST CUTHBERT'S EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
10 05/04/1837 WILSON CATHERINE JAMES WILSON F ST ANDREWS AND ST LEONARDS /FIFE
11 25/05/1837 WILSON CATHERINE MAC GREGOR / ALEXANDER WILSON F LEITH SOUTH EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
12 29/05/1837 WILSON CATHERINE ----- F NEILSTON /RENFREW
13 26/10/1837 WILSON CATHERINE MUNRO / ALEXANDER MUNRO F LEITH SOUTH EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
14 18/12/1837 WILLSON CATHERINE ----- F SCOONIE (FIFE) /FIFE
15 18/12/1837 WILSON CATHERINE ----- F SCOONIE (FIFE) /FIFE
16 10/01/1838 WILSON CATHERINE ----- F KETTLE /FIFE
17 02/02/1838 WILSON CATHERINE ----- F ST CUTHBERT'S EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
18 13/05/1838 WILSON CATHERINE BAIRD / MATHEW WILSON F AYR /AYR
19 06/11/1838 WILSON CATHERINE BLACKIE / WILLIAM BLACKIE F ST CUTHBERT'S EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
20 16/01/1840 WILSON CATHERINE WM GILBERTS F ST CUTHBERT'S EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
21 18/01/1840 WILSON CATHERINE ----- F SCOONIE (FIFE) /FIFE
22 27/02/1840 WILSON CATHERINE FALCONER / GEORGE FALCONER F LEITH SOUTH EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
23 05/09/1840 WILSON CATHERINE JOHN WILLIAM F CANONGATE EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
24 17/12/1840 WILSON CATHERINE ALEXANDER / JOHN ALEXANDER F CANONGATE EDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN
Ian Byers
Ian Byers's picture
BOAKE (and related) surname resource

At some point in the future, the historical 1970's publication - The Beech Tree : A Boake Family History (A History and Genealogy of the Boake Family of England, Ireland, America and Canada from 1333-1970) by Dorothy Boake Panzer (1918-?), may prove useful in tracing the Scottish BOAK families.

This publication is now available in a 2015 version - The Beech Tree - at alibris.com

John Horton
John Horton's picture
The Beech Tree on the Internet Archive

This book is available in electronic formats on the Internet Archive, even though it was published relatively recently in 1970:

The beech tree : a history and genealogy of the Boake family of England, Ireland, America and Canada from 1333-1970

Unfortunately the author notes on page 10 that:

No attempt has been made to trace the Scottish families except for one branch which was settled in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland, early in the 17th century at the time of the plantation of Ulster in 1611 by James I. Research into the Boak families of Scotland shall be undertaken in a few years and included in a supplement to this book.

There is another reference to Scotland just prior to that statement where she states that:

The name was found in Scotland during the 16th and 17th centuries in various forms. Listed in Lanark at Thankerton is a John Book (1626), a William Boak (1629) and a James Boak (1636) believed to be all of the same family.

Gillian Wilson
Gillian Wilson's picture
William Boak and Margaret Braidwood

Information from Norman Braidwood who says: "I originally inherited this information from a relative in Scotland who is no longer with us. According to family papers in her possession, Margaret Braidwood (c 26 May 1731 Libberton Lanark dtr of Joseph Braidwood and Isobell Gibson) married William Boak or Boag from Stirling at Walston in 1753. (Margaret grew up in Walston, Lanark with her family.) They had three daughters (Isobell - died at birth, Agnes and Catherine) in Walston before moving to Calder Midlothian. Another daughter Isobell was born there. That was all that is mentioned of this family, but I believe the information is accurate as she had intimate knowledge of descendants and families probably extracted from a family bible or handed down. I got the marriage date of William and Margaret from the LDS and dates of birth of Agnes (b 30 Apr 1756 Walston) and Isobel (b 13 Mar 1764 Mid Calder) from the IGI, but no sign of Catherine. Her date of birth I got from Mary Mowle's papers, as indicated. Margaret Braidwood was a cousin of Thomas Braidwood, the educator of the deaf. (Thomas b 1715 Covington Lanarkshire Scotland, son of Thomas Braidwood and Agnes Meek, d 1806 London), well-known mathematician and teacher, who was one of the pioneers in teaching the deaf to speak)."