1821-1827 - Surgeon Superintendent and Early Family

After his deployment to the HMS Liffey Thomas Braidwood Wilson was commissioned as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict transport Richmond. The vessel sailed from Sheerness on 27 November 1821 and via St. Jago arrived in Hobart Town on 30 April 1822, taking 154 days to complete the journey. James Kay was the master.1

Placeholder. Medical journal of the Richmond, convict ship from 31 October 1821 to 31 May 1822 by J B Wilson (sic), Surgeon and Superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed on a passage from England to Van Dieman's Land. This journal is in the form of a diary, including daily sick reports and details of victuals issued. Latitude and longitude, temperature and weather conditions are also recorded. Includes signature of Governor Thomas Brisbane. (Described at item level).2

The vessel's arrival was reported in the Hobart Town Gazette and Van Diemen’s Land Advertiser on 4 May 1822 as follows.

Ship News.—Arrived on Tuesday last from England, the transport-ship Richmond, Captain Kay, with 159 male convicts, one having died on the passage. — Surgeon Superintendant, Dr. T. B. Wilson, of the Royal Navy. The guard comprises a detachment of the 3rd Regiment of Infantry (Old Buffs), commanded by Lieut. Wright, of the same Regiment. She left the Downs the 6th of December, and touched at St. Jago's.3

Later that same month the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser reported on Thomas' dealings with the Royal Family.

The Surgeon Superintendent of the transport ship Richmond is T. B. Wilson, Esq. M. D. R. N. This Gentleman had the happiness of attending His Majesty, George the Fourth, to the Sister Kingdom Ireland, and from thence to Hanover, at which place he left the Royal retinue. Dr. Wilson confirms all the accounts relative to the genuine delight and enthusiastic affection that His Majesty profusely experienced from every rank and class of subjects in His foreign dominions.4

On 25 May 1822 Thomas is recorded as having Returned a quantity of sulphuric acid from the convict ship "Richmond" to the Sydney Hospital. The quantity, worth £15, was recorded in a table labelled “A List of Convict Ships arrived at Port Jackson from 12th April 1821 to 15th July 1822”, as part of an inventory requested by Frederick Goulburn, the New South Wales Colonial Secretary, and provided by a Mr. Bowerman of the General Hospital in Sydney on 16 July 1822.5 On 31 May 1822 Thomas Brisbane, the Governor of New South Wales, certified Thomas' conduct as surgeon in the following letter:

New South Wales

These are to Certify the Honorable the Commissioners of His Majesty's Navy that T. B. Wilson Esqr, M.D. Surgeon and Superintendent of His Ms. late hired Transport Ship Richmond, Mr. James Kay, master, has landed here two Convicts out of the 160 originally embarked on board the said ship, 157 of those remaining having been landed at Hobart Town as appears by a Certificate signed by the Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land and one having died on the voyage, together with the Guard over said Convicts, consisting of One Lieutenant, One Ensign and 31 Rank and File, and 5 Spouses and 4 Children belonging to said Guard: that he had submitted for my perusal his Journal of the voyage in the regular form, and that his Conduct meets my approbation.

I further Certify that Dr. Wilson has my permission to return to England by such opportunity as he maybe able to procure, this Government not being enabled to furnish Dr. Wilson a passage home he is consequently entitled to the usual allowance of Fifty Pounds Sterling as Passage Money.

Given under my Hand at Government House, Sydney, this Thirty First day of May, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty Two
Thos. Brisbane6

Brisbane had taken office in December 1821 and would later be remembered as having laid the foundations of the modern fabric of civil life... The separation of Tasmania as an independent colony was partially accomplished; a council was formed, partly as an advisory body to the governor, partly to relieve him of the responsibility of enacting laws and
ordinances for the good government of the colony; trial by jury was introduced in the law courts ; the censorship of the press was removed (and) immigration of free settlers was encouraged...7
, among other reforms.

Brisbane's counterpart in Van Diemen's Land, to a lesser degree, was William Sorell who had assumed office in 1817.8 In 1822 Sorell was still bound to follow the rule of New South Wales, which included sending any serious offenders there for trial. In one of the many letters between the two jurisdictions Thomas Braidwood Wilson is mentioned.

Colonial Secretary's Office
4th June 1822

Sir,

I have the Honor to acknowledge the receipt of your several letters under mentioned.

3rd May 1822. Respecting the Seven Seamen of the Mary Ann sent to Sydney on the Richmond.
6th Do. (Thomas?) Bowers Convict per Richmond allowed to Sydney on the recommendation ___ of Dr. Wilson.
8th Do. Four Convicts sent for Trial on Capital Charges.
10th Do. John Coward a Lunatic transferred for the Asylum at Castle Hill.
10th Do. Johanna Gough supposed to have escaped from the Factory at B

I have the Honor to be
Sir
Your Honors Most Obdt Hble Servant
F. Goulburn
Col. Secy9

On 7 June 1822 Thomas advertised that he was leaving the colony on the ship Richmond and that all claims (or moneys and accounts owing) should be presented.10 The process was a common one when a round trip to England could take up the best part of a year and stopped claimants suggesting you had departed to escape debt. The Richmond sailed for Batavia on 25 June 1822, as reported in the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser on 28 June 1822.

On Tuesday sailed for Batavia, the Almorah, Captain Winter; the Mary Ann, Captain Waringlon; the Richmond, Captain Kay.11

Thomas' journey on the vessel took a dramatic turn when the ship struck a reef off Hog Island in the Java Sea in late July 1822 which was reported by the New South Wales press in November 1822.

Saturday, Oct. 9-By accounts received from Batavia by the General Gates, we are sorry to have to report the total loss, off Hog Island, in the Java Sea, of the transport-ship Richmond, Captain Kay, which delivered male prisoners at this port in May last ; but we have the satisfaction to add, that no lives were lost, all hands have been carried to Batavia on the Almorah.12

A full account was reported in The Asiatic journal and monthly register for British and foreign India, China and Australasia in 1823.

LOSS OF THE SHIP RICHMOND.

The following details of the loss of the ship Richmond, Capt. Kay, on her passage from New South Wales to Batavia, have been kindly handed to us for publication, accompanied with an assurance of their perfect authenticity, as they are extracted from the journal kept by the officers on board.

July 31, 1822.- At a quarter past four A.M., the man on the foreyard called out "discoloured water upon the lee bow;" the helm was immediately put down, and the yards braced up, but the ship would not come round, and in two minutes struck on a reef, which extended upwards of a mile from the land, which proved to be Hog Island, situated in the eastern extremity of the Java Sea.

Every exertion was used to get her off, but without avail ; fortunately for us, as, had we succeeded in our endeavours, she would instantly have sunk in deep water, having very shortly after she struck lost her rudder, and had eight feet water in her hold. Guns were fired immediately to apprize the Almorab, Capt. Winter (which was astern) of our misfortune, and her danger. She immediately hauled her wind, and proved the means of saving our lives.

As the Richmond was now inevitably lost, the only duty left was to endeavour to save as many of her stores as possible ; but even in this we were unsuccessful, notwithstanding the utmost exertion of ourselves, and of the Almorah. It was high water when we struck, and when the tide ebbed, the surf became so high that one boat swamped, and the others were nearly sharing the same fate; and as Capt. Winter, notwithstanding the utmost caution and care, had nearly lost the Almorah on the reef, owing to the strong current setting thereon, we were under the necessity at noon of leaving the ill-fated Richmond to the plunder of the numberless inhabitants from the different islands.

Before leaving the ship, many large proas were near, and numbers approaching from the different islands; and there is every reason to believe, with an intention of making an attack upon us, but finding the Almorah so near, prevented them. Her loss can only be attributed to the strong southerly current, which we had not before experienced. On the 30th of July, at noon, we were in lat. 7° 46' S., and longitude 116° 7' E., and from thence we steered a W. by N.1/2 N.course, which ought to have taken us more than twenty miles to the southward of the islands. - Cal. Jour., Sept. 23.13

Thomas made it safely to England, and his misfortune obviously didn't deter him from his profession, or his intentions to settle in the antipodean colony. On 10 January 1824 Thomas wrote to the Governor of New South Wales seeking to swap his land grant in Van Diemen's Land for a similar grant in New South Wales.14 Around the same time presumably, in early 1824, Thomas was assigned as the Surgeon Superintendent of the convict transport ship Prince Regent. The ship, on it's second voyage to the colonies sailed from Cork, Ireland on 13 February 1824 and via Rio arrived in Port Jackson on 15 July 1824, 153 days later. Alexander Wales was the master.15

Placeholder. Medical and surgical journal of the Prince Regent convict ship, for 1 December 1823 to 21 July 1824 by [Thomas] Wilson MD, Surgeon and Superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed in a voyage to New South Wales.

Folio 1: John Millar, aged 37, Private of the 40th Regiment; disease or hurt, dislocation of the right humerus, by a fall down the hatchway. Put on sick list, 21 December 1823, at Deptford. Discharged cured, 4 January 1824.

Folio 2: William Walker, [age not recorded], Private of the 40th Regiment; disease or hurt, severe and acute pain over the whole of his abdomen, considerably increased by pressure, vomiting, belly costive. Put on sick list, 31 December 1823. Discharged to duty, 10 January 1824.

Folios 3-4: James Bowles, aged 47, convict; disease or hurt, severe griping pains in the abdomen, attended with frequent evacuations and tenesmus. Put on sick list, 24 February 1824, at sea. Died [3 March?] 1824.

Folio 4: John Roche, aged 28, Convict; disease or hurt, chest pains and difficult respiration. Put on sick list, 20 February 1824, at sea. Discharged cured, 15 March 1824.

Folios 5-7: Thomas White, aged 24; disease or hurt, pain across the chest particularly over the left breast. Put on sick list, 22 February 1824, at sea. Discharged [?].

Folios 7-8: John Milton, aged 26, private 40th Regiment; disease or hurt, [?]. Put on sick list, 27 April 1824, at sea. Discharged [?].

Folios 9-10: Michael Bowe, aged 26, convict; disease or hurt, chest pains, cough and tightness and dry throat, pulmonic ailment. Put on sick list, 1 July 1824, at sea. Discharged 13 July 1824 to Sydney Hospital.

Folio 10: J Roach, aged 28, convict; disease or hurt, debility. Put on sick list, 1 July 1824, at sea. Discharged [?].

Folios 11-12: Blank.

Folio 13: Numerical abstract of the medical cases mentioned in the journal.

Folios 13-14: Surgeon's general remarks.

Folio 15: Blank.16

On 21 July 1824 Thomas Brisbane, the Governor of New South Wales, certified Thomas' conduct as surgeon in the following letter:

New South Wales

These are to Certify the Honorable the Commissioners of His Majesty's Navy that T. B. Wilson Esquire, Surgeon and Superintendent of the Convict Ship Prince Regent, Mr. Alexander Wales, master, has landed here One Hundred and seventy seven male Convicts out of the One hundred and eighty originally embarked on board the said ship, three having died on the voyage: that he had submitted for my perusal his Journal of the voyage in the regular form, and that his Conduct meets my approbation.

I further Certify that Dr. Wilson has my permission to return to England by such opportunity as he maybe able to procure, this Government not being enabled to furnish him a passage home he is consequently entitled to the usual allowance of Fifty Pounds Sterling as Passage Money.

Given under my Hand at Government House
Sydney, this 21st day of July, 1824
(Signed) Tho. Brisbane17

Brisbane was, at the time of writing the letter, in the latter stages of his tenure, owing to internal faction fighting and a campaign by his colonial secretary, Frederick Goulburn, to undermine him. By the end of the following year both were recalled to England.18 Thomas Braidwood Wilson's life was not, at this point, so vexed. The day after Brisbane's letter was signed the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser also applauded Thomas' conduct as surgeon on the Prince Regent.

The Surgeon Superintendent of the Prince Regent is Dr. Wilson, R. N.-This is the second trip this Gentleman has made to the Colony. His first voyage was in the Richmond, which vessel was unfortunately wrecked homeward bound. It comes within our knowledge that Dr. Wilson has not only anxiously attended to the bodies of the unfortunate exiles committed to his care, but also studied, by every possible means, to enlighten and improve the nobler part - the mind. To the lasting fame of Dr. Wilson be it recorded, that several men not only now can read, but actually write - all owing to the establishment of schools on board, at the instance of the Doctor. That this is an example worthy of imitation none will attempt to controvert.19

On 23 September 1824 the Colonial Secretary responded to Thomas' letter from 10 January 1824 seeking an alternative land grant in New South Wales, advising him:

Colonial Secretary's Office
23rd September 1824

Sir,

Your letter of the 10th Instant, having been submitted to the Governor, I have been honored with this Instruction, that, provided it is your intention to settle in New South Wales within the Period of eighteen Months, His Excellency has no objection to reserve for you as many Acres of Land in this Colony, as you have given over in Van Diemen's Land to Mr. Ogilvie,

I have the honor to be,
Sir,
Your obedient Servant,
(Signed) F. Goulburn

T. B. Wilson Esqr.
Surgeon R. N.20

Thomas Braidwood Wilson Land Grant

Thomas Braidwood Wilson Land Grant
Colonial Secretary's Office New South Wales

While Frederick Goulburn was authoring the letter Thomas was probably already at sea in the Prince Regent on his way to Van Diemen's Land. His arrival there was reported in the Hobart Town Gazette and Van Diemen’s Land Advertiser on Friday 8 October 1824.

Friday, October 8. Ship News.-Arrived on Monday morning last from Port Jackson, after a tedious passage of 18 days, the barque Prince Regent, of 540 tons, Captain Wales, having on board the following passengers, viz. Doctor T. B. Wilson, R. N., Geo. Wm. Evans, Esq. Surveyor General of Van Diemen's Land, Major Bales, of the Royal Artillery,...The Prince Regent brought down also a Detachment of the 3d Regiment (Buffs) with their wives and families; likewise, several free women to join their husbands in this Colony, with three hundred chests of tea, a quantity of cedar, and 15 horses for Government.21

Thomas only stayed on the island for 21 days, after which he rejoined the Prince Regent as it returned to England via the Isle of France.

Sailed for England, Oct. 29, via the Isle of France, the ship Prince Regent, Captain Wales. — Passengers, Doctor Wilson, R. N. William Milliken, Esq. Major Bates, Mr. Able and Mr. Hook and family, from Van Diemen's Land.22

1824 Dec 20: Superintendent, "Prince Regent". Re assigned convict (NSW CSO Reel 6017; 4/5782 p.160)

In July 1825 Thomas' earlier land transaction where he replaced his grant in Van Diemen's Land with an equivalent allotment in New South Wales was mentioned in a despatch from Robert William Horton to Governor Darling.

UNDER SECRETARY HORTON TO GOVERNOR DARLING.
(Despatch per ship Catherine Stewart Forbes.)

Downing Street, 9th July, 1825.

Sir,
Dr. Wilson having resigned in favour of Lieut. Ogilvie, R.N., his claim to a Grant of Land in Van Diemen's Land, consisting of 2,000 acres, which had been originally granted to Lieut. Ogilvie's Brother, and of which Dr. Wilson had subsequently come into the possession, I am directed by Earl Bathurst to desire that the Land, which appears to have been reserved for Dr. Wilson' in New South Wales, consisting of as many acres as were given over by him to Lieut. Ogilvie in Van Diemen's Land, may be confirmed, that Gentleman having expressed the wish of fixing himself there in preference to the latter Colony.

I have, &c.,
R. W. HORTON23

1825: The Mangles (4) sailed from Cork, Ireland on 23 October 1825 and arrived in Port Jackson on 18 February 1826 (118 days). John Cogill was the master.24

Placeholder. Medical and surgical journal of the convict ship Mangles, for 31 August 1825 to 28 February 1826 by T B Wilson MD, Surgeon and Superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed in a voyage to New South Wales. [This journal is written in latin].

Folios 1-2: James Brown, aged 26, soldier; disease or hurt, pain, distress, high natural heat, quick pulse, feeble, bad feet. Put on sick list, 6 October 1825. Discharged 8 October 1825 to duty.

Folios 3-4: John Scott, aged 27, convict; disease or hurt, worn, rigid, damaged. Put on sick list, October 1825. Discharged 1 January 1826 cured.

Folio 5: Patrick Shendon, aged 27, convict; disease or hurt, same disease as many who joined the ship at Dublin [Gaol Fever?]. Put on sick list, 14 October 1825. Discharged 1 January 1826 cured.

Folio 5: John Clancy, aged 36, convict; disease or hurt, foul and deep ulcer on whole of right upper arm. Put on sick list, 14 October 1825. Discharged 9 February 1826 cured.

Folio 6: James Jess, aged 2, soldier's son; disease or hurt, convulsions and paroxysm. Put on sick list, 9 November 1825. Died 10 November 1825.

Folios 6-7: Mr Fitzgerald, aged 26; disease or hurt, pain in the eyes and light intolerance. Put on sick list, 1 November 1825. Discharged 10 November 1825 cured.

Folios 7-8: Daniel Hagan, aged 22, convict; disease or hurt, lateral and back pain, heavy chest pain, breathing difficulties, bad cough producing blood. Put on sick list, 25 November 1825. Discharged 1 December 1825 cured.

Folios 9-11: Mr Fitzgerald, aged 27; disease or hurt, very sore mouth and throat, teeth falling out. Put on sick list, 30 December 1825. Discharged 13 February 1826 cured.

Folios 11-12: Mr Lehey, aged 42; disease or hurt, troubling cough and difficulty breathing. Put on sick list, 2 December 1825. Died 13 February 1826.

Folios 13-14: Mr Tobin, aged 28; disease or hurt, sore mouth, loose teeth, difficulty swallowing, gum pain. Put on sick list, 2 December 1825. Discharged 13 February 1826 cured.

Folio 15: Numerical abstract of the medical cases mentioned in the journal.

Folios 15-16: Surgeon's general remarks.

Folio 17: Table of barometer readings and bearings of longitude and latitude.25

The ship's arrival was reported in the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser on 22 February 1826.

On Saturday last arrived the ship Mangles, Captain Cogill, from Ireland, with 189 male prisoners in good health-losing only one on the passage, and he was half dead when taken on board. The guard consists of a detachment of the 57th Regiment, under the orders of an Ensign. Surgeon Superintendent, Dr. Wilson, R. N.

...Dr. Wilson, in his usual obliging manner, very handsomely has furnished us with the latest European Journals in the Colony...26

Arrived, on Saturday last, the ship Mangles, Captain John Cogill, with 189 male prisoners from Cork, whence she sailed on the 23d of October; and came direct; lost one man on the passage. The guard consists of 32 rank and file of the 57th regt. under the orders of an ensign of the same regiment. Surgeon Superintendent, Dr. Wilson, R. N. Passengers, Brevet, Lieut. Col. Shadforth, 57th Regt. with his lady and daughter.27

In April 1826 Thomas attended a meeting of Australian Bank Shareholders at "Mr. James Underwood's house, in George Street" where they were to draft a Deed of Partnership. A Dr. Townson proposed that the meeting should also vote on company directors to which there was great argument. Thomas was reported to have argued for the proposition which ultimately occurred and "John Mc'Arthur, H. Mc'Arthur, J. Oxley, T. Mc'Vitie, J. Norton, Wolstonecraft, W. T. Jones, J. Brown, A. B. Spark, [and] R. Icely" were appointed directors.28

Thomas left Sydney for England on the Mangles as reported in the Australian on Wednesday 17 May 1826.

Sailed on Sunday last, the ship Mangles, Captain Earl for London via Rio de Janeiro. Lading, wool, timber and seal skins, pearl shells, and sundries. Passengers, Lieutenant Colonel Thornton, C. B. 40th Regiment, lady and two children, Captain Heaviside,and Lieutenant Le Marchant, 57th Regiment; Dr. Wilson, R. N. William Walker, Esq. (of the firm of Jones and Walker,), and son; Mr. Solomon Levey and son, Mr. Richard Roberts, Mr, William Clark, Mr. James McBrien, surveyor, Mr. J. M. Fenton, Elizabeth Cox, and several steerage passengers.29

The UK arrival was reported in the press.

SHIP NEWS.
EAST INDIA SHIPPING. The Mangles, Carr, from New South Wales, has arrived at Deal - sailed from Sydney the 14th May, and from Rio de Janerio 5th August. Passengers per Mangles, from New South Wales - Colonel and Mrs Thornton, two children, and two servants ; William Walker Esq. left at Rio ; Mr McBrien, Mr Penton. Dr Wilson, R.N., Solomon Levy Esq. and one servant ; and Master Richard Roberts. 30

While Thomas was in England a confidential dispatch from Governor Darling to Under Secretary Hay discussed the strange behaviour of Mr. J. MacArthur and mentioned the involvement of a Dr. Wilson. While this has not been confirmed as Thomas Braidwood Wilson it is recorded here in the event it is found to be related.

In a former Letter, I mentioned some of the thousand projects he had in view for the agrandisement of the Australian Agricultural Company. They all seem to have vanished, as the excitement, in which they were engendered, subsided; and he is still here, though having formally announced to me his intention of leaving this not less than three times. Once for the purpose of proceeding to China, afterwards to England, having Chartered the Lady Rowena, as he stated for the purpose, and sent a Dr. Wilson before him to make arrangements for his journey through Europe and Asia, meaning to visit the different Countries and return here by way of Bengal and China.31

Either way, Thomas was caught up in events on the other side of the world. On 23 October 1826 Thomas Braidwood Wilson, recorded as a doctor of medicine, bachelor, age 21 & upwards, of Old Elvet in the parish of Durham St.Oswald, obtained a licence to marry Jane Thompson (spinster), age 21 & upwards, of Old Elvet in the same parish.32 They couple were directed to the church of St. Oswald for the Anglican ceremony which was performed on 31 October 1826.

Thomas Braidwood Wilson (M.D., bachelor), of this parish married Jane Thompson, of this parish, by licence. Witnesses: George Clark Dixon, Edward Wylam.33

Jane Thompson was born on 23 October 1802 and baptised on 18 December 1803 in Sunderland, Durham, England, the daughter of John Thompson and Jayne Seymour.34 Patricia Clarke pictured Jane and Thomas' marriage by adding that Thomas was-

...perhaps in his blue coat, white waistcoat and black trousers. He was 34 years of age and his bride was nearly twenty-three. They had about six months together before he sailed off to Hobart on the Governor Ready.35

Thomas sent a letter from the Governor Ready to his wife.36

The Governor Ready (1) sailed from Portsmouth on 3 April 1827 and arrived in Hobart Town on 31 July 1827 (119 days). John Young was the master.37

Placeholder. Medical journal of the Governor Ready, convict ship, for 6 March to 6 September 1827 by S B Wilson (sic), Surgeon. (This journal is in Latin).

Folios 1-2: Henry Jones, aged 21, convict; sick or hurt, tonsillitis. Put on sick list, 29 March 1827. Discharged 5 April 1827.

Folios 2-6: John Watson, aged 50, convict; sick or hurt, pneumonia. Put on sick list, 5 April 1827. Discharged 5 May 1827.

Folios 7-9: Samuel Bailey, aged 45, convict; sick or hurt, erysipelas. Put on sick list, 11 April 1827. Discharged 28 April 1827.

Folios 9-11: Maurice Clifford, aged 20, convict; sick or hurt, cynanche pharyngea. Put on sick list, 12 April 1827. Discharged 20 May 1827.

Folios 11-13: Joseph Sutton, aged 30, marine; sick or hurt, [?]. Put on sick list, [?] April 1827. Discharged [1 May 1827?].

Folios 14-15: Frederick Seville, aged 20, convict; sick or hurt, headache. Put on sick list, 18 May 1827. Discharged [?].

Folio 16: J Morissy, aged 25, marine; sick or hurt, sore eyes. Put on sick list, [?] May 1827. Discharged 17 June 1827.

Folio 17: Charles Sterling, aged 22, convict; sick or hurt, syphilis. Put on sick list, [?] May 1827. Discharged [?] June 1827.

Folios 17-18: J Armitage, aged 20, convict; sick or hurt, porrigo (scurvy). Put on sick list, 10 May 1827. Discharged [?] July 1827.

Folios 18-20: William Andrews, aged 26, marine; sick or hurt, pneumonia. Put on sick list, [?] July 1827. Discharged [?] July 1827.

Folio 20: A nosological abstract of the medical cases mentioned in the journal.

Folios 20-22: Surgeon's general remarks.38

Thomas' daughter Mary Braidwood Wilson was born three days later on 3 August 1827 in Durham, England.39

Thomas is called upon to consult with colleagues upon the health of VDL Attorney General, T. McCleland.

SURGEON SCOTT TO LIEUT.- GOVERNOR ARTHUR.

5th August, 1827, 7 O'clock P.M.
Sir,
Your Excellency's letter with its enclosure of this evening's date, I have just received, and have to acquaint your Excellency that I visited the Persian Convict Ship on her coming to anchor, and found Mr. McCleland in the state as reported in the Surgeon's letter to your Excellency; however, considering all the circumstances of his case, I am in hopes that his removal from on Ship board to quiet Lodging on shore, where he will reap various advantages to which he has been for some months a Stranger to, will operate considerably to his advantage, although I fear much not to his thorough recovery. I will do myself the honor of communicating personally with your Excellency tomorrow morning respecting Mr. McCleland and on the best means to be adopted for his accommodation and recovery.
I have. &c,
J. SCOTT.

SURGEON SCOTT TO COLONIAL SECRETARY BURNETT.

Colonial Hospital, 22nd August, 1827.
Sir,
In conformity to your letter of this day's date requiring a Report on the State of Mr. Attorney General McCleland's Health, and recommending the assistance of Doctor Wilson, Surgeon and Superintendt. of the Prison Ship " Governor Ready," and Doctor Patton, Surgeon and Superintendent of the Prison Ship " Persian," I have to acquaint you, for the information of His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor, that the same has been complied with according to the accompanying Certificate.
I have, &c,
J. SCOTT, Col'l Surgn.

[Sub-enclosure.]

REPORT B Y MEDICAL BOARD.
WE , the undersigned have carefully examin'd into the state of Health of Robert McCleland, Esqe., Attorney General, and have unanimously made the following conclusions:—
1st. That, altho' his corporeal health is considerably improved since his arrival in this Colony, yet there is very little amendment as to the faculties of his mind.
2nd. That, allowing the most favourable prognoscis to take place, a long period must elapse, ere he could be able to perform his official duty.
3rd. That, taking into consideration the nature of the malady under which he labours, we deem it exceedingly doubtful, whether he ever will be competent to perform any duty requiring mental exertion.
Given under our hands at Hobart Town , Van Diemen's Land
Augt. 22nd 1827.
J. SCOTT , Col'l Surgeon.
T. B. WILSON , M.D., Surgn. R.N.
JAMES PATTON , M.D., Surgn. RN. 40

Sailed from Hobart-town.

Aug. 23...The ship Governor Ready, 512 tons, J. Young, commander, with 101 casks of whale oil from Mr. C. Wright, and 30 tons of potatoes from Dr. Wilson. Passengers.-Lieutenant Butler 39th regiment, and guard with their wives and children, J. Hood, Esq. Joseph T. Gellibrand ,Esq. Messrs. John Parker, Thomas Barker,, Mrs.Gibson, Mr. R. Legge, Mr. Michael Connor, Ann Cox, Ellen Partridge, John Brady, Richard Stuart and W. Oldfield, T. B. Wilson, Esq. Surgeon and Superintendent.41

  • 1. Bateson, Charles: The Convict Ships; Brown, Son & Ferguson, Glasgow. An additional resource for research of this vessel is the Founders and Survivors Storylines website.
  • 2. The National Archives: Medical journal of the Richmond, convict ship from 31 October 1821 to 31 May 1822 by J B Wilson (sic); http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C4106893 ADM 101/64/2
  • 3. "HOBART TOWN." Hobart Town Gazette and Van Diemen’s Land Advertiser (Tas. : 1821 - 1825) 4 May 1822: 2. Web. 28 Feb 2014; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1089688.
  • 4. "Sydney." The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) 24 May 1822: 2. Web. 28 Feb 2014; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2181000.
  • 5. NSW CSO Reel 6055; 4/1761 p.21
  • 6. NSW CSO Reel 6009; 4/3505 p.362
  • 7. HRA Series 1 Volume 11, p. vii (Preface by Frederick Watson)
  • 8. John Reynolds, 'Sorell, William (1775–1848)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/sorell-william-2680/text3747, published in hardcopy 1967, accessed online 28 February 2014.
  • 9. NSW CSO Reel 6009; 4/3505 p.382
  • 10. "Classified Advertising." The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) 7 Jun 1822: 1. Web. 28 Feb 2014; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2181045.
  • 11. "Ship News." The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) 28 Jun 1822: 2. Web. 1 Mar 2014; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2181117.
  • 12. "FURTHER MERCANTILE DISASTERS." The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) 22 Nov 1822: 3. Web. 1 Mar 2014; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2181458.
  • 13. The Asiatic journal and monthly register for British and foreign India, China and Australasia; Allen, 1823, Volume 15
  • 14. NSW CSO Reel 6013; 4/3512 p.445
  • 15. Bateson, Charles: The Convict Ships; Brown and Son, Glasgow. Uhl, Jean: ibid; incorrectly dates this to 1821.
  • 16. The National Archives: Medical and surgical journal of the Prince Regent convict ship, for 1 December 1823 to 21 July 1824 by [Thomas] Wilson MD, Surgeon and Superintendent; http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C4106871 ADM 101/61/2
  • 17. NSW CSO Reel 6013; 4/3512 p.153
  • 18. J. D. Heydon, 'Brisbane, Sir Thomas Makdougall (1773–1860)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/brisbane-sir-thomas-makdougall-1827/text..., published in hardcopy 1966, accessed online 27 February 2014.
  • 19. The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser Thursday 22 July 1824
  • 20. NSW CSO Reel 6013; 4/3512 p.445 (Fiche 3117; 4/1840A No.1070 pp.331-8)
  • 21. Hobart Town Gazette and Van Diemen’s Land Advertiser Friday 8 October 1824
  • 22. The Australian Thursday 2 December 1824
  • 23. HRA Series I, Volume 12, p. 14
  • 24. Bateson, Charles: The Convict Ships; Brown and Son, Glasgow.
  • 25. The National Archives: Medical and surgical journal of the convict ship Mangles, for 31 August 1825 to 28 February 1826 by T B Wilson MD,; http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C4106754 ADM 101/47/4
  • 26. "SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE." The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) 22 Feb 1826: 2. Web. 27 Feb 2014; http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2185274.
  • 27. The Australian Thursday 23 February 1826
  • 28. The Australian Saturday 29 April 1826
  • 29. The Australian Wednesday 17 May 1826
  • 30. SHIP NEWS - Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, October 9, 1826; Issue 16402. British Library Newspapers
  • 31. HRA Series I, Volume 12, p. 523
  • 32. Durham Records Online: http://www.durhamrecordsonline.com/ (Marriage Bonds, Durham Diocese District - Record Number: 537598.14)
  • 33. Durham Records Online: http://www.durhamrecordsonline.com/ (Marriages, Durham District - Record Number: 253314.1)
  • 34. "England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N58Y-HH8 : accessed 27 Feb 2014), Jane Thompson, 23 Oct 1802.
  • 35. Clarke, Patricia: the life and times of Mary Braidwood Mowle, 1827-1857; Allen and Unwin p. 17
  • 36. Patricia Clarke: A Colonial Woman : the Life and Times of Mary Braidwood Mowle, 1827-1857; Allen & Unwin, Sydney, Boston, 1986; p. 16
  • 37. Bateson, Charles: The Convict Ships; Brown and Son, Glasgow.
  • 38. The National Archives: Medical journal of the Governor Ready, convict ship, for 6 March to 6 September 1827 by S B Wilson, (sic); http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C4106620 ADM 101/30/2
  • 39. Reported in Clarke (1986) and Rackham but not confirmed from primary sources.
  • 40. HRA S. III – V. VI (pp. 142-143) - T. B. Wilson - Report Regarding Health of T. McCleland
  • 41. Hobart Town Gazette Saturday 25 August 1827

Locations: 

Ships: