Wilson Family Location Information

The following location information has been reproduced from the GENUKI website. The locations are mentioned frequently in The Wilson Family of Uphall Register. To visualise the close association of these parishes the ScotlandsFamily.com website have made available a Map of Parishes in the Counties of Midlothian, West Lothian , and East Lothian which has been cropped to demonstrate the relevant locations. In general they appear to cluster around the central border between West Lothian and Midlothian, with Uphall as the epicentre.

Map of Wilson Related Parishes

A Map of Wilson Related Parishes in Scotland
Image Cropped from Map of Parishes in the Counties of Midlothian, West Lothian , and East Lothian

Calder (Mid or West)

(see Mid Calder and West Calder)

Campsie, Stirling

Extract from Parish of Campsie (Presbytery of Glasgow, Synod of Glasgow and Ayr, County of Stirling) By the Rev. Mr. James Lapslie, Minister (Statistical Account of Scotland 1791-1799):

"Situation and Name - The parish of Campsie measures eight English miles in length, and seven in breadth, following the two great lines of road which intersect the parish nearly at right angles; the mean length is about six miles, and the mean breadth six containing 36 square miles; and allowing only 400 acres to every square mile, the amount will be 14400 acres; it contains 101 plough gates of land, and is valued at 6429 pound Scots. It is bounded on the North, by the parish of Fintry; on the West, by Strathblane and Baldernock; on the South by Calder and Kirkintilloch; on the East by Kilsyth; forming a distinct commissariot along with Hamilton, stiled the commissariot of Hamilton and Campsie.

It is presumed, that the winding appearance of the strath in general, and particularly of the glens near which the parish church is situated, has given rise to the name Campsie, or Camsi, which in the Celtic language, is said to signify crooked Strath or Glen. Of course, the Clachan of Campsie, is, the place of worship of the crooked glens.

Indeed, if we attend carefully to the appearance which this district presents to those who view it from any of the neighbouring stations, particularly the bending of the hills in the form of an amphitheatre, above the village of Clachan, from which five streams, pouring down from five winding glens form the water of Glazert, this etymology of Campsie will not appear unnatural."

Carriden, West Lothian

Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868):

"CARRIDEN, a parish in the county of Linlithgow, Scotland, 2 miles to the N. of Linlithgow. It is situated in a well-cultivated district on the S. side of the Frith of Forth, and includes the villages of Blackness, Bridgeness, Grangepans, Cuffabouts, and Muirhouses. This place is supposed to have been the eastern termination of the Wall of Antoninus, and to have been the site of one of the forts which occurred at intervals along its length - a fact probably alluded to in its name, which is a corruption of Caereden, signifying "fort on the wing". Various Roman relics were discovered here about the middle of the last century.

Cramond, Midlothian

Extract from Groomes Gazetteer of Scotland (c.1895):

"A village in the North West corner of Edinburghshire and a parish until 1891 partly also in Linlithgowshire. The village is situated on the Firth of Forth at the East side of the mouth of the river Almond. Its name in Celtic signifies 'the fort upon the Almond' and it occupies the site of an important Roman station, which was connected by a fine military way with the great English Watling Street and with Antonius' Wall, and which has yielded coins of eleven emperors, three altars, a pavement, and on other Roman remains. The parish contains the seaport of Granton, the villages of Davidsons Mains and Cramond Bridge."

Kirkliston, West Lothian

Extract from Groomes Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland (c.1895):

"A village in Linlithgowshire, and a parish also in Edinburghshire. The village, occupying a rising-ground on the left bank of Almond Water, has a station on the Queensferry branch of the North British, 1 ½ mile NNW of Ratho Junction, 3 ½ miles S of South Queensferry, and 10 W (by road only 8) of Edinburgh. It takes name from the parish church and Liston Manor, being distinguished by the prefix Kirk from Old Liston, New Liston, Over New Liston, Hal Liston, and Illiston or High Liston, all in the same parish. Some of its houses are good and modern, yet it offers on the whole a poor appearance; and has a post office, with money order, savings bank, and telegraph departments, an inn, and a long-established distillery."

Kirkliston, Midlothian

Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868):

"KIRKLISTON, (or K'liston), a parish partly in county Edinburgh and partly in county Linlithgow, Scotland, 9 miles W. of Edinburgh. It is intersected by the Falkirk and Edinburgh turnpike road, and by the Edinburgh and Glasgow railway, which latter has a station at Winchburgh, and a viaduct of thirty arches across the river Almond, in this parish. It comprehends a village of its own name and the villages of Newbridge, Niddry, and Ninchburgh. Its length is 5½ miles, and its greatest breadth 4½. The surface is varied by rising grounds."

Kirknewton, Midlothian

Extract from Groomes Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland (c.1895):

"A village and a parish of W Edinburghshire. The village stands 5 furlongs E by S of Midcalder or Kirknewton Junction on the Caledonian railway, this being 36 ¼ miles E of Glasgow, and 11 WSW of Edinburgh. It has a post office, with money order, savings bank, and telegraph departments, a public hall, an inn, and a police station. The parish, containing also the villages of East Calder, Oakbank and Wilkieston, comprises the ancient parishes of Kirknewton and East Calder.

Livingston, West Lothian

Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)

LIVINGSTON, a parish in the county Linlithgow, Scotland, 16 miles from Edinburgh. It is a railway station on the Edinburgh and Bathgate line. The parish contains a village of its own name, and also a portion of the village of Blackburn. It stretches from 5 to 6 miles along the left bank of the Briech water, which separates it from the county of Edinburgh by a breadth of from 3 to 4 miles. One of the roads from Edinburgh to Glasgow intersects the parish. The surface is much diversified, and at Dechmont-law attains a height of 686 feet above the sea-level.

Mid Calder, Midlothian

Extract from Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland (1885):

"A village and a parish on the west border of Edinburghshire. The village stands on rising ground, near the left bank of the Almond, which here receives the confluent Murieston and Linhouse Waters, 2 miles west by north of Mid Calder or Kirknewton junction.”

Uphall or Strathbrock, West Lothian

Extract from Groomes Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland (c.1895):

"A village and a parish of S Linlithgowshire. The village stands, on the left bank of the Brox Burn, 1 1/2 mile W by S of the town of Broxburn, and 7 furlongs N by W of Uphall station on the North British railway, this being 13 5/8 miles WSW of Edinburgh, and 5 ¾ E by N of Bathgate. It has a post office, with money order, savings bank, and telegraph departments, a public hall, a parish church hall, two inns, one of them a well-known coaching stage.

The parish, containing also the town of Broxburn, originally was known as Strathbroke ('valley of the brock or badger'); and it took that name from the Burn of Brocks or Brocks' Burn, corrupted now into Brox Burn. It is bounded NE and E by Kirkliston, SE and S by Kirknewton and Midcalder in Edinburghshire, and W and NW by Livingston and Ecclesmachen. Its utmost length, from ENE to WSW, is 4 1/4 miles; its utmost width 3 1/2 miles; and its area is 4561 1/4 acres, of which 20 1/4 are water."

West Calder, Midlothian

Extract from Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland (1885):

"A town and a parish in the extreme west of Edinburghshire. The town stands, at 550 feet above sea level, on the right bank of the West Calder Burn and has a station on the Edinburgh and Glasgow direct section of the Caledonian, 5 7/8 west-southwest of Mid Calder Junction, 16 west-southwest of Edinburgh and 31¼ west of Glasgow. Since 1861 it has undergone great and rapid extension, chiefly in connection with neighbouring mineral works.”