This website is in the process of being upgraded, some links and/or elements may not be functioning correctly. Feel free to contact us if you want to discuss anything in particular.

Dorothy (Ann) Woodhead

Dorothy was the eldest daughter and second eldest child of John and Sarah Woodhead (nee Chadwick) of Elmton in Derbyshire, with Dorothy baptised on 4 March 1815 at the local St Peter's parish church. 1 Dorothy was one of a very long line of the Woodhead family to have been baptised, married or buried in this heritage listed 1771 Anglican church. The church registers date as far back as 1599 and Woodhead family baptisms recorded from 1625; marriages from 1629; and burials from 1627.

Elmton - Church

ELMTON, a parish in the hundred of Scarsdale, county Derby, 7 miles S.W. of Worksop, and 9 N.E. of Chesterfield, its post town and railway station. It includes the hamlet of Cresswell, from which it is separated by a wide common on the N.E. Limestone is plentiful in the neighbourhood. The soil is a thin marl. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Lichfield, value £120. The church is a small plain edifice, dedicated to St. Peter. There are a few small charities for the poor. W. H. De Rodes, Esq., is lord of the manor. Jedediah Buxton, the calculating boy, was born here." 2
 

ELMTON is a township and small agricultural village, forming, with the hamlet of CRESSWELL, a parish, 9 miles east from Chesterfield, 7 south-west from Worksop and 9 north-west from Mansfield, on the borders of Nottinghamshire, and 1¾ miles south-west from Creswell station on the Mansfield and Worksop branch of the Midland railway, in the North Eastern division of the county, eastern portion of the hundred of Scarsdale, Eckington petty sessional division, Worksop union and county court district, rural deanery of Staveley, archdeaconry of Derby and diocese of Southwell. The church of St. Peter, rebuilt in 1771, is a small and plain building of stone, consisting of chancel, nave and a low tower, reaching a few feet only above the roof and containing 3 bells, recast in 1845 : there are 150 sittings. The, register dates from the year 1599 for all entries. The living is a vicarage, average tithe rent-charge £54, with 4 acres of glebe, value £6, gross yearly value £98, in the gift of the Duke of Portland, and held since 1891 by the Rev. David Hepburn Brown M.A. of Exeter College, Oxford. The Rev. Francis Gisborne, formerly rector of Staveley, left in 1811 a sum of £5 19s. 2d. which is distributed to the poor annually. Here are limestone quarries. The common was inclosed in 1841. The Duke of Portland is lord of the manor and principal landowner. The soil is limestone ; subsoil, rock. The chief crops are wheat, barley, oats and roots. The area is 2,830 acres; rateable value £3,637; the population in 1881 was 518, of which Creswell has 300.
CRESWELL is 1¾ miles north-east, where there is a station on the Mansfield and Worksop line of the Midland railway.

Elmton Church (Dave Bevis - CC BY-SA 2.0 - Wikimedia Commons)

Parish Clerk, Robert Rodgers.

LETTER BOX, near the church, cleared at 3 p.m
LETTER BOX, Creswell cleared at 4 p.m.
Letters through Chesterfield.
The nearest money order office is at Clown & telegraph office at Creswell station.

School, Creswell, built for 100 children ; average attendance, 89 : Mrs. H. M. Finch, mistress
Railway Station, Cresswell, Ultimus Jackson, station master

Aldam Mrs. Whaley - hall
Brown Rev. David Hepburn M.A. - Vicarage.

COMMERCIAL.
...
Woodhead Bryan, farmer
Woodhead William, shopkeeper, Creswell
3

In January of 1841, the local newspaper reported that Dorothy, at the age of 26 and whilst employed as a house and laundry maid in the service of John Lingard, had been tried and convicted of stealing.

DERBYSHIRE QUARTER SESSIONS
Wednesday Jan 6
JOHN BALGUY, ESQ., Chairman
Anne alias Dorothy Woodhead, aged 24, charged with stealing, on the 16th of November, one half-crown piece, four shilling pieces, and four penny pieces, and other articles, the property of Joseph Redfern, and whilst being employed as a domestic servant to the said Joseph Redfern. – Guilty.

There was another case against her of a similar nature, for stealing the property of a former employer, Mr John Lingard, of Brimington – vis. two sheets, two pillowcases and other articles.

THE CHAIRMAN, in passing sentence, said she had been found guilty of extremely bad offence, namely the robbery of her master; and he would not be doing his duty if he allowed her any longer to remain in this country. – Sentenced to seven years transportation. 4

Dorothy Woodhead was charged upon two indictments, - the first, with stealing, on the 16th November, at Chesterfield, one halfcrown piece, four one shilling pieces,an four penny pieces, the property of Joseph Redfern, and whilst being employed as a domestic servant; and the second with stealing, at Brimington, two sheets, two pillow cases,and one breakfast cloth, the property of John Linguard. Guilty on both counts - Sentenced to seven years' transportation. 5

FELONY BY A SERVANT.
Anne alias Dorothy Woodhead, aged 24, for stealing at the parish of Brimington, two sheets, two pillow cases,and one breakfast cloth, the property of John Linguard, and, on another indictment, at Chesterfield, one halfcrown piece, four one shilling pieces,an four penny pieces, the property of Mr. Joseph Redfern, whilst being employed by him as a domestic servant. 6

The trial indictment revealing the details of both her first and second offences -

January Sessions 1841 - Indictment
The Queen against Ann Woodhead

Ann Woodhead late of the parish of Chesterfield in this County; Singlewoman otherwise called Dorothy Woodhead in the custody of Mr John Sims keeper of the Common Gaol at Derby in the said County being brought to the bar here and indicted arraigned and tried for feloniously stealing taking and carrying away on this sixteenth day of November now last past at the parish aforesaid whilst she was servant to one Joseph Redfern one piece of the current silver coin of the realm called a half crown of the value of two shillings and six pence, four pieces of the current silver coin of the realm called shillings of the value of four shillings, four pieces of the current copper coin of the realm called pennies of the value of four pence and one musical box of the value of ten shillings the property of and belonging to the said Joseph Redfern, her master as aforesaid; also being also indicted arraigned and tried for feloniously stealing taking and carrying away the first day of April now last past at the parish aforesaid whilst she was servant to one John Lingard two sheets of the value of one pound, two pillowcases of the value of two shillings and one tablecloth of the value of two shillings of these goods and chattels of the said John Lingard her Master as aforesaid and being found Guilty on both the said indictments this Court doth order that the said Dorothy Woodhead here committed to the custody of the said John Sims and transported as soon as conveniently may be for the term of seven years to be computed from the time of her conviction to such place or places, part or parts beyond the Seas as her majesty shall for that purpose declare or appoint And this Court doth also order that Samuel Hart, John Radford, Lorenzo Hall, Thomas Peach, James Cocker, Anthony Radford Stratt and Thomas Bent Esquires, Justices of the Peace for the said County or any two of them be and they are hereby appointed to contract with any person or persons for the transportation of her this said Ann Woodhead otherwise called Dorothy Woodhouse in manner and for the term aforesaid and to cause such security to be taken as the statute in that case made and provided directs to be taken and to order her to be delivered pursuant to such contract to the person or persons contracting for him or to her or their ….. And doth also order that the said Joseph Redfern be and he is hereby discharged from the recognizance entered into by him for his appearance at this Sessions to prefer the charge first mentioned Bill of Indictment and give witness thereon and that Charles Cotterill of Chesterfield aforementioned Constable be and he is hereby discharged from the recognizance entered into by him for his appearance at this Sessions also to give evidence on the said Indictment and …. …. John Lingard be ………… at this Sessions to prefer the said second mentioned bill of Indictment and give evidence thereon and that the said Charles Cotterill be and he is hereby discharged from the recognizance entered into by him for his appearance at the Sessions also to give evidence on the said last mentioned Indictment And doth further order that the Treasurer of this Country do pay to Mr Falls Solicitor in the said first mentioned prosecution the sum of Six pounds and twelve shillings for the expenses of the said prosecutor and his Witnesses; and unto Messrs Lucas and Cutts Solicitors in the said second mentioned prosecution, the sum of Eight pounds nineteen shillings and six pence for the expenses of the prosecution and his Witnesses. 7

Royal Oak - Chesterfield

At the time of her arrest and trial, Dorothy's parents, John (55) and Sarah (50) and her younger siblings Dinah (20) and Thomas (10) were still living in the same house in the village of Elmton. 8

On 4 October 1843, John Bailey, a farm labourer and batchelor and still holding his convict Conditional Pardon, applies for permission to marry Dorothy, who had arrived as convict #433 per ship Garland Grove in October 1841. 9 John and his two convicted accomplices had arrived in Hobart Town on 18 August 1830 in the convict transport ship David Lyon.

Dorothy and John tie the knots of matrimony at St James Church, Jericho on new Years day, 1 January 1844. 10 The witnesses were Thomas Bailey, who is most likely John's oldest brother and Jane Upton who signed with her mark. Dorothy is still under sentence and effectively, provided she is of good behavior, finds a way "out" of the convict system and is in some way, "assigned" to her husband.

The 1842 census of the Oatlands district taken on 1 January, shows there is a Mrs (Jane) Upton residing with three children in a building owned by Patrick Gough on the High street in the Oatlands township. 11 &12

The next census, taken in 1848, reveals Dorothy and her new family living in a house, this time owned by John Page. The occupants are most likely husband John (a married, free Anglican male farmer, aged 21-45); Dorothy (a married free Anglican female, aged 21-45 with no stated occupation); John's older brother Thomas (a single free male farm servant aged 21-45); and Dorothy's first two children, Henry and John, born locally in 1846 and 1847 and aged Under 2 and 2-7 respectively. 13 &14

By 1851, Dorothy's parents, John (66) and Sarah (65) and her younger sibling Reuben (30) were still living in the same residence in the village of Elmton next to three uninhabited houses. 15 Dorothy's father John passed away in Elmton in 1861 at the age of 73; and by 1871, her mother Sarah (82) was living with her daughter Maria (48) and her husband Henry Ward (42) at Hollin Hill in the village of Clowne. 16 Dorothy's mother, Sarah passed away in 1877, aged 88, and was laid to rest alongside her husband John in St Peters Church cemetery in Elmton.

Dorothy passed away at her Parattah residence at the age of 75 from an internal obstruction and exhaustion on 2 December 1890. The informant was Dorothy's son Samuel Bailey. 17

Deaths.
BAILEY.-On Saturday, November 29, 1890, at her residence, Newick, Parattah, the wife of John Bailey, sen., in the 76th year of her age.
Funeral will leave her late residence at 12 noon of THIS DAY, December 2, when friends are invited to attend. 18

  • 1. England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA - FHL Film Number: 428910, 498079
  • 2. Description from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
  • 3. Kelly's Directory of the Counties of Derby, Notts, Leicester and Rutland pub. London (May, 1891) - pp. 202-3
  • 4. British Library Newspapers online - The Derby Mercury Newspaper, Wednesday January 13th 1841, p4, col 1
  • 5. British Library Newspapers online - Derbyshire and Chesterfield Reporter, Wednesday 6th January 1841
  • 6. British Library Newspapers online - Derbyshire Courier & Chesterfield Gazette, Saturday 9th January 1841
  • 7. Source details to be added
  • 8. 1841 Census of England - HO107; Piece: 195; Book: 11; Civil Parish: Elmton; County: Derbyshire; Enumeration District: 7; Folio: 6; Page: 6; Line: 20; GSU roll: 241297
  • 9. TAHO: Marriage permissions - CON52/1/2 - Page 21
  • 10. TAHO: Marriage registration - RGD 37/1/4 #1502
  • 11. TAHO: 1842 Census of Oatlands - CEN 1/1/35 - Oatlands p1
  • 12. TAHO: 1842 Census of Oatlands - CEN 1/1/35 - Oatlands p2
  • 13. TAHO: 1848 Census of Oatlands - CEN 1/1/94 - Oatlands p1
  • 14. TAHO: 1848 Census of Oatlands - CEN 1/1/94 - Oatlands p2
  • 15. 1851 Census of England - HO107; Piece: 2122; Folio: 608; Page: 18; GSU roll: 87752
  • 16. 1871 Census of England - Class: RG10; Piece: 3463; Folio: 108; Page: 13; GSU roll: 839423
  • 17. TAHO : Death registration - RGD 35/1890 # 1068 - Oatlands
  • 18. Family Notices - The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) 2 December 1890: p1
Printer Friendly, PDF & Email
Locations
Ships